A treatment for ALS and Alzheimer's

A treatment for ALS and Alzheimer's

When the ALS Therapy Development Institute invited me to speak at their annual White Coat Affair gala last October, I took advantage of the opportunity to tour the Institute’s lab where they are performing fast-track ALS research. While there, our tour passed by the freezer where AT-1501, a potential effective treatment for both ALS and Alzheimer’s, is stored.

Mariemont, Ohio lacrosse coach leads fight against Lou Gehrig's disease

Mariemont, Ohio lacrosse coach leads fight against Lou Gehrig's disease

Former All-American Graham Harden, diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease in 2016, has been sharing his lacrosse skills by coaching both boys and girls lacrosse at Mariemont High School. He hopes to step back on the field this spring as coach. "If I don't show them that I can fight it, why would they do that on the field?" Harden asked.

Researchers show how Lou Gehrig’s disease progression could be delayed

A team of biomedical scientists has identified a molecule that targets a gene known to play a critical role in the rapid progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), sometimes known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, the neurodegenerative disease that affects motor neurons — nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that link the nervous system to the voluntary muscles of the body.

Freezin' for a reason: Valentine Plunge in New Jersey raises money to support people with ALS

Freezin' for a reason: Valentine Plunge in New Jersey raises money to support people with ALS

With the wind chill making it feel like 14 degrees on the beach on Saturday, February 4 and the ocean temperature a shockingly cold 42 degrees, the brave souls who participated in Saturday's Valentine Plunge in Manasquan, New Jersey gambled and lost. But the Joan Dancy and PALS Foundation that works on behalf of people with Lou Gehrig's Disease came out the winner.

Eye muscles resist ALS progression, but more research needed to understand why

Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have intact eye muscle movement, even at more advanced stages of the disease, according to new research. However, the reason remains unknown. Researchers say that discovering how this happens may help in the design of novel treatments to fight the loss of muscle activity in ALS patients.

ALS patients communicate for first time in years with new device based on blood-oxygen levels

ALS patients communicate for first time in years with new device based on blood-oxygen levels

ALS patients with complete paralysis can communicate in a limited manner using a computer interface that detects their thoughts based on blood oxygen levels in the brain, according to a new study.

A Homecoming: Augie Nieto returns to Life Fitness, the company he created

A Homecoming: Augie Nieto returns to Life Fitness, the company he created

September 16 was a warm and sunny day in Franklin Park, Illinois, when Augie and Lynne Nieto arrived at the Life Fitness factory there.

It had been nearly 16 years since Augie, the cofounder and former chief executive of the company, had last entered the building, which had been its headquarters when he served as president.

Protein seen to have ‘housekeeping’ talents that protect neurons in diseases like ALS

A protein called Nrf2 could clear the harmful, misfolded proteins that cause Parkinson’s and other neurodegenerative diseases — including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) — by activating “housekeeping” mechanisms within cells, according to a new study in Parkinson’s models.

Neuron Death in ALS May Be Triggered by Increased Toxic Excitatory Nerve Signaling

Increased excitatory toxic signaling in neurons in the part of the brain controlling movement triggers the breakdown of cells long before any symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are noticed — at least in mice with ALS.

Pete Frates honored by NCAA

Pete Frates honored by NCAA

The Massachusetts man who inspired the Ice Bucket Challenge that's raised millions of dollars nationwide for ALS research is being honored at his home.

The NCAA hand-delivered an award to Pete Frates, the former Boston College baseball captain who touched off the national craze.

Scientists find stem cells in brain’s meninges, possibly leading to future ALS therapies

Researchers have found neuronal progenitor cells (immature cells that can become neurons) in the meninges, a three-layer structure enclosing the brain that protects the nervous system, according to a new study. This finding may lead to the development of new stem cell therapies for brain damage and neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)

ALS Ice Bucket Part of Smithsonian’s ‘Giving in America’ Philanthropy Exhibit

ALS Ice Bucket Part of Smithsonian’s ‘Giving in America’ Philanthropy Exhibit

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History opened its long-term exhibition “Giving in America” on Nov. 29 to display the history of philanthropy’s role in shaping the United States. The collection includes one of the first buckets that tied the Ice Bucket Challenge to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which eventually went viral over social media.

The inspiring story of O.J. Brigance thriving with ALS

The inspiring story of O.J. Brigance thriving with ALS

His movements are no longer his own. Whether it's help from his longtime nurse Bill or the mobility from his motorized wheelchair, O.J. Brigance is making the most of his life with ALS.

Repeated head injury causes neurodegeneration, but link to ALS less clear

The study, “Microglial neuroinflammation contributes to tau accumulation in chronic traumatic encephalopathy,” was published in the journal Acta NeuropathologicaCommunications.